This U.S. Army Dentist Single-handedly Killed Almost 100 Japanese Soldiers To Save His Patients

It was 98 Japanese soldiers to be exact, but the part about U.S. Army dentist Capt. Benjamin Salomon killing them by himself is an amazing fact. During the Battle of Saipan Japanese commander, Yoshitsugu Saito ordered a suicide charge against the Americans out of desperation. Little did he know it yet, but the position the […]

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It was 98 Japanese soldiers to be exact, but the part about U.S. Army dentist Capt. Benjamin Salomon killing them by himself is an amazing fact. During the Battle of Saipan Japanese commander, Yoshitsugu Saito ordered a suicide charge against the Americans out of desperation. Little did he know it yet, but the position the young Army dentist volunteered for would become a brutal last stand with him being outnumbered by 1:100.

After ordering his patients to make a run for it, Salomon positioned himself on a machine gun and proceeded to kick some wholesale ass. Salomon was post-humously awarded the prestigious U.S. Medal Of Honor on May 1, 2002. He was originally not eligible to receive it as he was military medical personnel.

The Japanese banzai charge made it past the Army’s perimeter and into Salomon’s field hospital, directly in front of him as he tended to patients.

MOH records the first contact:

“Captain Salomon kicked the knife out of the hand of one, shot another, and bayoneted a third. Captain Salomon butted the fourth enemy soldier in the stomach and a wounded comrade then shot and killed the enemy soldier.” 

And then Salomon’s last stand where he would ultimately met his death.

After four men were killed while manning a machine gun, Captain Salomon took control of it. When his body was later found, 98 dead enemy soldiers were piled in front of his position.”

U.S. Army Dentist Capt. Benjamin Salomon

From health.mil:

After Ben Salomon received his doctorate from the University of Southern California Dental College in 1937, he practiced dentistry for just a handful of years joining the military in World War II. In the fall of 1940, soon after the National Selective Service Act became effective, Salomon was drafted into the U.S. Army as an infantry private and quickly excelled in his military training, being placed as the regimental dental officer of the 2nd Battalion, 105th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division.

Salomon, the only dentist to receive the Medal of Honor to date, received the distinction for his sacrifice in battling Japanese forces at Saipan. He was first recommended for the Congressional Medal of Honor by Capt. Edmund G. Love, the 27th Division historian, but it was denied because he was considered ineligible as a member of military medical personnel. It wasn’t until May 1, 2002, more than a half-century following the war, that he was finally awarded with the honor.

Citation: “Realizing the gravity of the situation, Captain Salomon ordered the wounded to make their way as best they could back to the regimental aid station, while he attempted to hold off the enemy until they were clear. Captain Salomon then grabbed a rifle from one of the wounded and rushed out of the tent. After four men were killed while manning a machine gun, Captain Salomon took control of it. When his body was later found, 98 dead enemy soldiers were piled in front of his position.”

The post This U.S. Army Dentist Single-handedly Killed Almost 100 Japanese Soldiers To Save His Patients appeared first on HistoryAddicted.com.


This U.S. Army Dentist Single-handedly Killed Almost 100 Japanese Soldiers To Save His Patients was first posted on June 2, 2021 at 12:58 pm.

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